More Misconceptions, Myths and Criticisms Explained

These next few blogs will hopefully separate the fact from the fiction of ABA. ABA continues to be misunderstood by so many people – we are really passionate about providing an accurate picture of ABA and dispelling these myths. For us, it is deeply frustrating, but for families it may stop them connecting with services that can actually help. We hope that by us, and other ABA providers writing blogs, providing training and video examples of what ABA looks like now we can, over time erase these myths.  Ok, so, more 2 criticisms for you.

THERE ARE LOTS OF THERAPIES OUT THERE AND NO THERAPY IS BETTER THAN ANOTHER.

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FICTION.

The internet may churn out a huge selection of therapies, services and advice pages for helping someone with autism. For anyone starting their search this is incredibly overwhelming. So, where do you start? You want help, it to be effective, to be valuable to your child and family, to support you in the tough times, to teach you how to manage the tough times. That’s a long list, but to sum it up – you want it to work, so it has to be proven to work. This is where ABA is at the top of that huge list. ABA is the only scientifically proven form of therapy for autism. The scientific evidence backing the use of ABA therapy for individuals with autism is overwhelming. Applied Behaviour Analysis is an evidence-based practice and effectiveness of ABA practices are well documented in peer reviewed scientific journals.

THE FIELD OF ABA IS UNREGULATED.

FICTION.

Unfortunately, until very recently, the field of ABA had been unregulated in much of the world, meaning that technically anyone could claim to be an ABA practitioner. But, thankfully, this has changed. The Behaviour Analyst Certification Board (BACB) oversees the field of ABA (https://www.bacb.com). They set standards, document best practice and ethical guidelines that registered practitioners must adhere to. They have introduced 4 formal qualifications and accreditations. Starting with RBT (Registered Behaviour Technician), BCaBA (Board Certified assistant Behaviour Analyst – Clare’s qualification), BCBA (Board Certified Behaviour Analyst – Leila and Heather’s qualification) and BCBA –D (Board Certified Behaviour Analyst-Doctoral) with the latter being the highest accreditation.  If you are looking into ABA providers please check for these credentials. This can be done on the BACB website using the link above.

Have a question for us? Or have heard something different, please, get in touch. We’d love to hear from you.